Bill would create database of violent juvenile offenders

OFFENDERS. 11 JOURNALIST DAVID COLLINS TELLS US HOW IT WOULD WORK. DAVID: SUPPORTERS OF THE BILL HOLD IT ABOUT TRANSPARENCY. MANY BELIEVE THAT THE JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEM OPERATES IN SE CRET. THE PUBLIC DOES NOT HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY TO KNOW THE SENTENCE OF CONVICTED VIOLENT OFFENDERS, NOR THE PLANS TO HELP REHABILITATE THEM. >> A FEW YEARS AGO I WORKED IN A JUVENILE DETENTION CENTER. AND WHAT I SAW WAS HORRIFYING. YOU WOULD HAVE CHILDREN COMING TO ANDUT O, NOT GETTING THE RESOURCES THAT NEED. AND THE WORST, ISHE TRE IS NO TRANSPARENCY. DAVID: TOMORROW TOMORROW DELETEGA DELYA ATTAR, WHO WAS ALSO CITY PROSECUTOR, IS PUSHING FOR LEGISLATION THAT INCLUDES A SEARCHABLE PUBLIC DATABASE ON JUVENILE OFFENDERS. THE INVOICE EXCLUDES PERSONAL INFORMATION. >> WHAT HE DOES IS HE LOOKS SAY A MURDER HAS BEEN COMMITTED, THAT WAS THE RESULT. THESE RESOURCES HAVE BEEN PROVIDED TO THIS CHILD OR TAO CHILD, AND NOT TO ANY PARTICULAR CHILD. AND THE IATS INTEREST IN GREATER TRANSPARENCY, TO ENSURE WE ARE PROPERLY REHABILITATING THESE CHILDREN. DAVID: PUBLIC DEFENDER JENNY WORRIES YOUNG PEOPLE CAN BE IDENTIFIED. THIS WOULD DESTROY CONFIDENTIALITY, THE CORNERSTONE OF REHABILITATION. >> ALTHOUGH THE DATABASE MAY BE CONFIDENTIAL, THIS DOES NOT MEAN THAT PEOPLE IN THE PUBLIC ARE NOT REFERRING THIS INFORMATION TO YOUNG PEOPLE ON THE BLOCK OR THEIR STREET. JOURNALIST: JUVENILE CRIME HAS FALLED 61% SINCE 2019, ACCORDING TO STATE OFFICIALS. AND OPPONENTS TO THE BILL CLAIM TRANSPARENCY IS ALREADY BUILT INTO THE SYSTEM. >> DJS PUBLISHES FULL REPORTS IN EVERY DISTRICT IN THE STATE AND THERE ARE ALREADY LAWS IN PLACE TO ENSURE VICTIMS GET THIS INFORMATION. >> WHEN THERE IS TRANSPARENCY, WE CAN LOOK AND SAY YOU KNOW WHAT? THIS PROGRAM MAY NOT WORK BEST FOR THIS TYPE OF SCENARIO, BUT MAE WEYB CAN REQUEST IT OR WE CAN TRY TO SEND OTHERWISE. DAD: VI THE SAME BILL DIED IN COMMITTEE LAST YEAR. HOWEVER, THE BILL’S SPONSOR SAYS THE LEGISLATION HAS DIRECTED THE STATE TO CREATE A LINK ON DJ’S WEBSITE THAT GIVES VICTIMS OF CRIMES AND AN EMAIL AND PHONE NUMBER TO USE TO DETERMINE THE STATUS OF THEIR CASE .

Maryland bill would create database to track violent juvenile offenders

A state legislator who represents Baltimore has a new idea for tackling youth crime and holding the system accountable. Baltimore City Delegate Dalya Attar, D-District 41, who is also a city attorney, is proposing House Bill 1142 to create a database to keep track of violent juvenile offenders. The juvenile justice system is believed to operate in secrecy and the public has no opportunity to learn about the sentences of convicted violent offenders or plans to help them rehabilitate. “A few years ago I worked in the juvenile center and what I saw there was horrible,” Attar said. “You’d have kids coming in and out without getting the resources they need, and the worst part is there’s no transparency.” Attar’s bill would create a searchable public database of juvenile offenders that would exclude personal information, such as name, age, race, address or gender. Proponents argue that the bill is about transparency and accountability. “However, what he does, let’s say a murder was committed, that was the outcome, those resources were provided to that child or a child, not to a particular child, and the point of that is more transparency so that we can make sure that we rehabilitate these children correctly,” Attar said. said Egan. Opponents of the bill argue that transparency is already built into the system. Juvenile Services) publishes comprehensive reports ranging from soup to nuts in every district in the state, and there are already laws in place. ‘state to make sure victims get that information,” Egan said. is transparency, we can start looking at it and say, “You know what? This program might not work best for this kind of scenario, but we po maybe we can fix it or we can try something else,” Attar said. Attar said she convinced the state to create a link on the Maryland Department of Juvenile Services website that gives victims of crime the ability to determine the status of their case. state, youth crime has dropped 61% since 2019. The same bill died last year in committee.

A state legislator who represents Baltimore has a new idea for tackling youth crime and holding the system accountable.

Baltimore City Delegate Dalya Attar, D-District 41, who is also a city attorney, is proposing House Bill 1142 to create a database to track violent juvenile offenders.

The juvenile justice system is believed to operate in secrecy and the public has no opportunity to learn about the sentences of convicted violent offenders or plans to help them rehabilitate.

“A few years ago I worked in a juvenile center and what I saw there was horrible,” Attar said. “You’d have kids coming in and out without getting the resources they need, and the worst part is there’s no transparency.”

Attar’s bill would create a searchable public database of juvenile offenders that would exclude personal information, such as name, age, race, address or gender. Proponents argue that the bill is about transparency and accountability.

“However, what he does, let’s say a murder was committed, that was the result, these resources were provided to this child or a child, not to a particular child, and the purpose of that is more transparency so we can make sure that we are rehabilitating these children properly,” Attar said.

But public defender for minors Jenny Egan said she fears minors could be accidentally identified, destroying confidentiality, a cornerstone of rehabilitation.

“While the database may be confidential, that doesn’t mean people in the public won’t match this information to young people in their neighborhood or on their street,” Egan said.

Opponents of the bill argue that transparency is already built into the system.

“(Maryland’s Department of Juvenile Services) publishes comprehensive reports ranging from soup to nuts in every district of the state, and there are already laws in the state to ensure that victims get this information” , Egan said.

“When there’s transparency, we can start looking at it and say, ‘You know what? This program might not work better for this type of scenario, but maybe we can fix it or try something else,” Attar mentioned.

Attar said she convinced the state to create a link on the Maryland Department of Juvenile Services website that gives victims of crime the ability to determine the status of their case.

According to state officials, youth crime has dropped 61% since 2019.

The same bill died last year in committee.